push

push vb Push, shove, thrust, propel mean to use force upon a thing so as to make it move ahead or aside.
Push implies the application of force by a body (as a person) already in contact with the body to be moved onward, aside, or out of the way
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push a wheelbarrow along the road

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push a door open

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push a man over a cliff

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an extra locomotive was needed at the rear to push the long train up the grade

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push the excited children into another room

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Shove often differs from push in carrying a stronger implication of the exercise of muscular strength and of forcing something along a surface
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the boys shoved the furniture up against the walls

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I picked him up trying to shove in the front door. There wouldn't been any door in a minute— Hellman

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Often, when muscular exertion is not strongly implied, haste or roughness or rudeness in pushing is suggested
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shoved the paper into his pocket

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shove the articles on the desk into a box

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shove a person out of one's way

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I can't say that I took the drink. It got shoved into my hand— Warren

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Thrust differs from push in carrying a weaker implication of steadiness or continu- ousness in the application of force and a stronger suggestion of rapidity in the movement effected or of violence in the force that is used; often the use of actual physical force is not clearly implied
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Abraham . . . thrust the old man out of his tent— Taylor

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thrust her hands in her coat pockets in a coquettish pose— Wouk

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Often, also, it implies the sudden and forcible pushing (as of a weapon, implement, or instrument) so that it enters into the thing aimed at
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thrust a spear into an opponent's breast

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thrusting their money into a stranger's hand— Wolfe

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Propel implies a driving forward or onward by a force or power that imparts motion. In some use it implies pressure exerted from outside or behind, usually by some power that is not human
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the flow of air which propels the slow-sailing clouds— Lowes

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she walked—as if she were being propelled from the outside, by a force that she neither knew nor could control— Taté

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Additionally, it is the usual term when the use of a mechanical aid or of an actuating power (as steam or electrical power) is implied
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ships propelled by steam

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a galley propelled by fifty oars

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automobiles are usually propelled by internal-combustion engines

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In extended uses push implies a pressing or urging forward (as with insistence, with vigor, or with impetuousness) so that one's end may be gained, one's work may be completed, or one's goal be reached
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push the nation into war

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push a theory to an extreme

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he directed a yearlong probe . . . then pushed through sweeping reforms— Armbrister

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Shove often suggests obtrusiveness or intrusiveness or lack of finesse in attaining an end or making a way for oneself or another
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shove oneself into society

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shoving the boring tiring jobs off onto other people— Ann Bridgey

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Thrust implies a forcing upon others of some-thing that is not wanted, desired, or sought for
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some have greatness thrust upon 'em— Shak.

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Amy had a grievance . . . because Sophia had recently thrust upon her a fresh method of cooking green vegetables— Bennett

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Propel is sometimes used in place of impel when a strong inner urge or appetite is implied as pushing one on, especially toward what one desires
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anxiety is not the only force that propels us, but it is surely one of the most potent— Binger

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Analogous words: *move, drive, impel: *force, compel, constrain, oblige

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Push — is a verb, meaning to apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force . It may also refer to:In arts and media: * Push (song), by Matchbox Twenty * Push (Enrique Iglesias song), Enrique Iglesias… …   Wikipedia

  • Push It — «Push It» Сингл Static X из альбома Wisconsin Death Trip …   Википедия

  • push — ► VERB 1) exert force on (someone or something) so as to move them away from oneself or from the source of the force. 2) move (one s body or a part of it) forcefully into a specified position. 3) move forward by using force. 4) drive oneself or… …   English terms dictionary

  • Push — 〈[pụʃ] m.; (e)s, es [ ʃız]〉 oV Pusch 1. 〈fig.; umg.〉 (nachdrückliche) Unterstützung eines Produktes od. einer Person durch Werbemaßnahmen, Nutzen von Beziehungen usw. 2. 〈Sp.; Golf〉 Schlag, der den Ball zu weit in die der Schlaghand… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Push It — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Push It» Sencillo de Garbage del álbum Version 2.0 Lado B Lick the Pavement Thirteen Publicación 16 de marzo/28 de marzo, 1998 (Airplay) …   Wikipedia Español

  • push — (v.) c.1300, from O.Fr. poulser, from L. pulsare to beat, strike, push, frequentative of pellere (pp. pulsus) to push, drive, beat (see PULSE (Cf. pulse) (1)). The noun is first recorded 1570. Meaning approach a certain age is from 1937. Meaning… …   Etymology dictionary

  • push — push; push·er; push·ful; push·ful·ly; push·ful·ness; push·i·ly; push·i·ness; push·ing·ly; push·ing·ness; push·mo·bile; si·yakh·push; …   English syllables

  • Push — Push, n. 1. A thrust with a pointed instrument, or with the end of a thing. [1913 Webster] 2. Any thrust. pressure, impulse, or force, or force applied; a shove; as, to give the ball the first push. [1913 Webster] 3. An assault or attack; an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Push — Push, v. i. 1. To make a thrust; to shove; as, to push with the horns or with a sword. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To make an advance, attack, or effort; to be energetic; as, a man must push in order to succeed. [1913 Webster] At the time of the end… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Push — Push, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pushed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pushing}.] [OE. possen, pussen, F. pousser, fr. L. pulsare, v. intens. fr. pellere, pulsum, to beat, knock, push. See {Pulse} a beating, and cf. {Pursy}.] 1. To press against with force; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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